Trusts: The Court of Appeal reviews the elements required to establish knowing receipt, including unconscionability

Sukhninder Panesar examines a case that explores liability for knowing receipt and the need for a continuing proprietary interest The claimant must show that they have a continuing proprietary interest in property which is in the hands of the alleged knowing recipient. Where such a finding is not made, the requisite unconscionability does not exist, …
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Offshore: Making the most of mistake

Rebecca McNulty discusses two recent cases from the UK and Jersey courts that emphasise the importance of a complete evidence picture when establishing mistake If the court is to be persuaded that there has been a genuine mistake, it needs to be provided with all relevant correspondence and documents so that such an assessment can …
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Trusts: Doing away with the need for detrimental reliance

Guy Holland analyses whether a cohabitee’s beneficial interest can be varied by express agreement alone In finding that detrimental reliance was not the only route to establishing unconscionability, Kerr J has identified a clear distinction between the approach to be adopted in single name and joint name cases. It is well established that detrimental reliance …
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Practice spotlight: Can you trust your instincts?

Sheila Rusike and Jo Summers outline some interesting trust practice points gleaned from their recent experience for the benefit of other practitioners It is worth checking exactly how the trustees’ names appear on the Land Registry records to make sure any deeds you create (such as a deed of retirement and appointment) match. Trust and …
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Trustees: Call of duty?

James Sheedy reviews what the trustee needs to know about impact investing A possible solution in answer to the desire of beneficiaries to ‘do good’ with trust funds is for trustees to appoint assets out to beneficiaries for them to then apply them as they deem appropriate. In the last few years, there has been …
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Cryptocurrencies and trusts: Watch and learn

Daniel Scott analyses a civil fraud case that may serve as a precursor for similar cases in the private client sphere on the misappropriation of cryptocurrencies The concession made in this case is to favour the trust analysis such that it is now relatively uncontroversial to view cryptocurrencies as property capable of being held on …
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Equity, volunteers and unconstituted trusts: Certainty of subject matter

Mark Pawlowski considers whether a volunteer can enforce a promise to settle property Fletcher highlights the difficulty in any particular case in determining whether or not there is an intention to create a trust of the promise. In most cases the requisite intention will be absent and, therefore, will prove fatal to the existence of …
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Trustees: The court’s power to bless decisions

Melody Munro reviews a case that exposes the delicate balance trustees have to maintain between beneficiaries’ wishes and what is best for the trust It is, quite rightly, not for the court to impose its own view of the merits of a decision but rather to consider whether the trustee’s decision is one which a …
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Trusts: Making well-documented inquiries

Robert Lindley and Wesley O’Brien provide a step-by-step guide to dealing with missing or uncooperative beneficiaries It will be important for the trustee to be capable of demonstrating that it has made sufficient reasonable efforts to find and/or contact the relevant person. Trusts exist for the benefit of their beneficiaries and it is to beneficiaries …
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Mistake: Forgiven, but not rewritten

Oliver Auld reviews the scope of the Jersey courts to set aside a voluntary disposition or other transaction on the grounds of mistake While the court accepted that Art 47G gave it a flexible decision-making power to determine the extent to which a voidable exercise of power has effect, the court was not persuaded that …
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